Current Issues with Drs. Bhandari and Swiontkowski

Current Issues with Drs. Bhandari and Swiontkowski
OrthoJOE
Current Issues with Drs. Bhandari and Swiontkowski
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Episode 1 December 30, 2020 00:18:56

Hosted By

Mohit Bhandari, MD Marc Swiontkowski, MD

Show Notes

Welcome to the OrthoJOE podcast with Dr. Marc Swiontkowski and Dr. Mohit Bhandari. In this second episode of OrthoJOE, we’ll be talking about our background in orthopedics, the purpose and mission for our podcast, and topics we cover in both of our publications including the use of antibiotic cement in arthroplasty, registry data, randomized trials, and trial numbers. We also discuss how different trials covering the same subject matter can yield such different results.

Dr. Marc Swiontkowski is an orthopedic trauma surgeon at the TRIA Orthopedic Center Bloomington. He is the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. He’s also an active researcher sponsored by the National Institutes of Health.

Dr. Mohit Bhandari is a professor and academic head of the division of Orthopedic Surgery at McMaster University in Ontario. He holds the Canadian Research Chair in evidence-based orthopedics.

If you have any comments, questions, or topics you would like us to cover, please feel free to reach out so we can read your messages and possibly answer your questions during the next episode of OrthoJOE.

Talking Points:

  • The use of antibiotic cement in arthroplasty
  • The biggest challenge in registry data 
  • Subject numbers and other necessities for trials
  • Knee replacement and hip replacement trials

Other Episodes

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February 15, 2021

Femoral Neck Fracture Evidence

Welcome to the OrthoJOE podcast with Dr. Marc Swiontkowski and Dr. Mohit Bhandari. In this episode of OrthoJOE, Marc and Mo are talking about the choice of a unipolar or bipolar prosthesis design for displaced femoral neck fractures which are treated with hemiarthroplasty. They discuss randomized clinical trials (scientific approach to control bias) vs registry data (real world). They also have a lively discourse about revision rates. If you have any comments, questions, or topics you would like us to cover, please feel free to reach out so we can read your messages and possibly answer your questions during the next episode of OrthoJOE. Talking Points: Orthoevidence article: “Unipolar vs bipolar hemiarthroplasty similar in elderly displaced femoral neck fractures in elderly individuals” Lessons from Mo’s large random control trial concerning fractures The debate about total versus hemiarthroplasty The advantage of a total hip replacement The statistics of the trial The need for a repository of data Clinical decision-making about cementification and revision Resources/Links: Farey JE, Cuthbert AR, Adie S, Harris IA. “Revision Risk After Unipolar or Bipolar Hemiarthroplasty for Femoral Neck Fractures: An Instrumental Variable Analysis of 62,875 Procedures from the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry.” J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2021 Feb 3;103(3):195-204. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.20.00486. PMID: 33208595. https://europepmc.org/article/med/33208595  HEALTH Investigators, Bhandari M, Einhorn TA, Guyatt G, Schemitsch EH, Zura RD, Sprague S, Frihagen F, Guerra-Farfán E, Kleinlugtenbelt YV, Poolman RW, Rangan A, Bzovsky ...

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00:14:43

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December 06, 2021

Clavicular Fractures with special guest Michael McKee

In this episode, Marc and Mo are joined by special guest Michael McKee (Chairman of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Arizona College of Medicine in Phoenix, past President of the Orthopaedic Trauma Association) in a deep dive into Dr. McKee’s impact on the field of orthopaedics, particularly his role as a leader in establishing multicenter trials focusing on clavicular fractures and his expectations for future research in this area. OrthoJOE Mailbag: feedback, comments, and suggestions from our audience can be sent to [email protected] Links: Canadian Orthopaedic Trauma Society. Nonoperative treatment compared with plate fixation of displaced midshaft clavicular fractures. A multicenter, randomized clinical trial. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2007 Jan;89(1):1-10. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.F.00020. PMID: 17200303. https://jbjs.org/reader.php?id=198776&rsuite\_id=1021775&native=1&source=The\_Journal\_of\_Bone\_and\_Joint\_Surgery/89/1/1/abstract&topics=sh#info McKee RC, Whelan DB, Schemitsch EH, McKee MD. Operative versus nonoperative care of displaced midshaft clavicular fractures: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2012 Apr 18;94(8):675-84. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.J.01364. PMID: 22419410. https://jbjs.org/reader.php?id=201211&rsuite\_id=1146706&native=1&source=The\_Journal\_of\_Bone\_and\_Joint\_Surgery%2F94%2F8%2F675%2Fabstract#info Swiontkowski M. Editor’s Choice: Are We Overtreating Clavicular Fractures? OrthoBuzz, July 9, 2014. https://orthobuzz.jbjs.org/2014/07/09/editors-choice-are-we-overtreating-clavicular-fractures/ ...

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00:21:58

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June 07, 2021

Women in Orthopaedics (with special guests Ann Van Heest and Laurie Hiemstra)

In this episode, Marc and Mo are joined by special guests Ann Van Heest (Professor and Director of Education in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Minnesota) and Laurie Hiemstra (Orthopaedic Surgeon at Banff Sport Medicine and soon-to-be President-Elect of the Canadian Orthopaedic Association) in an illuminating discussion on the challenges faced by women in the field of orthopaedics—and, more importantly, what can be done to address these challenges. This topic was suggested by one of our listeners (Rostanda Meireles, the first woman in the Brazilian Hip Society) via the OrthoJoe mailbag ([email protected]). The discussion touched on a number of themes:  What systematic disadvantages do women continue to face in orthopaedics?  How do these institutional barriers impact their careers in terms of meeting the requirements for board certification, becoming successful surgeons, obtaining grants and industry support, performing original research, publishing articles, and so on?  How do cultural differences around the world impact women as they try to become established in the field? How can these issues be addressed locally, nationally, and internationally? How can we address the root causes of the “pipeline” issue, given the fact that 50% of medical students in the US are female, compared with only 15% of orthopaedic surgeons? What has worked, what hasn’t worked, and where should we be focusing our efforts going forward? How can we drive cultural change for the purpose of increasing the representation of women in positions of leadership within the field?  How can men ...

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00:25:14